Sunday, January 10th, 2010 | Author:

 

Indian art and craft has always been admired, appreciated and imitated. It comes as a sheer delight to notice that despite the presence of diverse cultures, diverse customs, diverse languages and habits, Indian art and craft as a whole has always shone by its sheer cultural richness. One of the siblings of rich Indian art and handicraft is patchwork that has always remained in shadows. Patchwork is all about combining together the pieces of fabric into a larger, beautiful design. It is also known as piecing in many parts of Indian subcontinent.

 

Patchwork can also said to be one of the primary construction techniques. Usually, patches of numerous colors and designs are formed together to make a larger design. The final design is normally based on repeat patterns. Appliqué and patchwork often go together. Patchwork is a detailed and precise craft and needs lots of practice and expertise. The joining of clothes must be precise. Most often than not, basic geometric shapes are used in these designs.

 

If we talk specifically about Indian states then, this craft flourishes in western states of Gujarat and Rajasthan. Indian patchwork has one unique feature of highlighting jazzy shades on the patches. The stitches are usually, not hidden. This helps in adding a bit extra to entire artistic flavor. States like Orissa and Punjab also practice this craft and one has to see these beautiful patchworks.

 

It is believed that patchwork came to India from Arab and Europe and today, it is a widely prevalent and practiced craft inside Indian Territory. Patch works thrive on artists’ creativity and imagination. Western Indian art and craft consider patchwork as an integral part of its culture. Some patchworks are made using ornaments with motifs. Colors are bold and often mixed with aesthetic motifs of animals, birds and trees. The beauty of patchwork can be witnessed in quilts, cushion covers, wall hangings, bed covers and even decorative items.

 

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