Wednesday, May 06th, 2009 | Author:

Indians are privileged to have many traditions of paintings. The rich tradition of Indian art has witnessed emergence of renowned painters who have mesmerized us with their wonderful art works. Talking about different traditions, miniature paintings is one of the most popular and established tradition of painting. Its popularity is not just limited to Indian borders. Miniature paintings of India are exquisite, charming and proud representative of amazing Indian heritage. Miniature paintings are different in many aspects including colors and brush strokes. Gentle use of strokes and usage of natural colors make them unique.

 

Miniature paintings trace its roots to 6th-7th century. Since then it has kept evolving and has turned out to be one of the richest tradition of Indian paintings. These forms of paintings provide a personified form to different plots, themes and motifs. Often the color used in paintings are made up of precious stones, silver, shells, minerals, gold, indigo and vegetables etc. It goes without saying that making these natural colors is a tough task but then it also helps in bringing out that unique feel to each art work. This form of art requires skills and perseverance.

 

Miniature paintings got valuable patronage from Rajputs, Mughals, Buddhists and Jains. The art was never shorn of support and talent. It received praiseworthy help and guidance in different eras. Plenty of rich and diverse themes have been used in the art. Themes as diverse as mythology, epics, classical music and philosophies of different rulers have been portrayed. Several animals, plants, court scenes, flowers etc have also been depicted in these art works.

 

Rajput and Mughal School of paintings are the pre-dominant miniature paintings. Both have their own paintings and are quite different from each other in terms of themes, color combination and imagery. This tradition is still flourishing in many parts of India but the state of Rajasthan as an edge over other states when it comes to miniature art schools.

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